Faculty News: Elizabeth Crane’s We Only Know So Much in the Los Angeles Times

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Elizabeth Crane’s novel We Only Know So Much gets a rave review in the Los Angeles Times:

Crane is at her best in describing the young love of Otis, and in her depiction of Jean as a long-suffering wife who can’t really figure out why she’s suffering. For obvious reasons, she can’t fully share her grief over the suicide of her lover, one’s usual port of solace, which makes her isolation nearly absolute. Seeking an outlet, she attends a grief-counseling group and makes up a story about the death of her husband, rather than her lover. Though the scene rings a bit hollow — in a small town, such lies are easily found out — the scene is also poignant. Subconsciously, she’s choosing her dead lover over her husband.

We think. As the title says, we know only so much, an observation that applies to what Crane tells us of the Copelands and their lives, but also what the Copelands understand about each other, and themselves, making this a wry evocation of modern life, at once familiar but also revelatory.

 

 

 

By | 2017-05-18T16:48:29-07:00 August 24th, 2012|Categories: Faculty News|Comments Off on Faculty News: Elizabeth Crane’s We Only Know So Much in the Los Angeles Times

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