8:00am: Breakfast

 

9:00am – 10:30am

Guest Faculty Lecture: Caitlin Rother (Nonfiction)

Room: Salon 4

Writing True Crime. True crime is almost more about research, interviewing (how to get people to talk to you, and then how to get what you need to write scenes, which can be quite challenging) and structure than it is about pure writing. In this lecture, we’ll go through a hypothetical research exercise, examine best methods, and discuss how you go from reading about a crime to writing about a crime. I will give an overview how I put together a true crime book, from inception — settling on a book-worthy murder case that I know that I can and will want to live with for the next few years — through the research and interviewing phases, as I come up with, and often rethink, the narrative structure based on who and what information to which I can get access. Then I will lead them through a research exercise for one of the projects they are currently working on, using examples from my own book projects to show what works and what doesn’t.

 9:00am – 10:30am

Faculty Lecture: Jill Alexander Essbaum (Poetry)

Room: Salon 6

Texts, Textures, Textiles: Threading Narrative Through Verse, Weaving Lyricism Into Prose. Ever sewn a quilt?  No?  Good.  I haven’t either.  But here’s what I know about quilting—you got squares and you got thread.  Thread fastens square to square.  Voila: quilt.  And you need both.  Otherwise all you have is piles of fabric and tangles of string.  You get the picture. Many of us write in more than one genre.  And it’s inevitable that one will feed the other.  Poems grow plots, your stories wax poetic, and all is right with the world.  But what if it’s not?  Can a poem be too narrative?  Can prose be too poemy?  Where do the forms converge?  Where do they part ways?  Which is thread and which is cloth?  How do I sew it all together?  When should I rip out the seams? Does it matter? Do I care?  In this lecture we’ll explore the ways that prose and poetry work upon each other (and occasionally, work against each other) and consider some techniques to employ, as well as pitfalls to avoid, and bad habits to break so that everything you write will make your reader long to tuck into it.

10:30am – 11:000m

Graduate Lecture: Marion Ruybalid (Nonfiction)

Room: Salon 4

Similar Patterns in Unique Structures. What makes a story unique, but relatable at the same time? In memoirs that cover childhood through young adulthood, one may stumble into similar themes. For example, authors will address themes such as childhood, fitting in, sexuality, and grief, but these topics are presented differently. In this lecture, we will examine the structure of three memoirs, Lucy Grealy’s Autobiography of a Face, Emily Rapp’s Poster Child, and Elizabeth Kim’s Ten Thousand Sorrows, in order to examine how book structure can be a powerful tool in creating a unique experience for the reader.

10:30am – 11:000m

Graduate Lecture: Nancy Wilder-Trippel (Poetry)

Room: Salon 4

Rhyme Travel. The phone rings.  It’s a recital for a reading…and you are invited!  You and a whole chorus line of other poets! Because a poem is like a dance and a poet is like a choreographer, your breath is like the meter.   How does a poem move across the page’s stage? What are the steps? In what the poet Charles Olson calls ‘Projective Verse’, the poem is determined by the interaction between the ear and the pressure of the breath. What is said is what is heard. In this sense, all poems are performances. Language is active.  Content is shaped through form. This lecture will explore the process that creates the dance of words that becomes the poem.

 

12:00pm – 1:00pm: Lunch

1:00pm – 2:30pm

Guest Faculty Lecture: Clay Smith (All)

Room: Salon 6

Book Criticism in the Modern Age. In this conversation with David Ulin, the editor of Kirkus Reviews will talk about the modern age of literary criticism.

1:00pm – 2:30 pm

Faculty Lecture: Joshua Malkin (Screenwriting)

Room: Salon 4

THE QUICK PITCH. We make jokes about it: “Jurassic Park meets Manhattan,” “Tokyo Story meets Toy Story,” but rarely address the techniques of quickly and effectively presenting the essence of your narrative in response a crucial, common, and nerve-wracking question:  “what are you working on?”  This conversation will focus on boiling down your story into a SHORT one to two minute pitch that grabs attention, targets the market, and persuades decision makers to read your screenplay.

 

2:30pm-3:30pm

Guest Faculty Lecture: Charles Thompson (Fiction/Nonfiction/Poetry/Playwriting)

Room: Salon 6

How to Submit to Literary Journals — A Step-by-Step Guide to Acceptance: Submitting your creative work to literary journals, contests and festivals can feel equally daunting and confusing. How to start? Is my work ready to go out into the world? What journal should I submit to first? Can I handle rejection? In this workshop, those questions and more will be answered. We’ll cover getting your work ready for submission, how and where to submit if you’re just starting out, how to track your submissions, submissions do’s and don’t s, rejection and how to deal with it (keep submitting!), and finally what happens once you receive that glorious acceptance. By the end of the lecture, you should have the tools and information needed to take that leap and submit!

2:30pm-3:30pm

Faculty Lecture: Elizabeth Crane (Fiction)

Room: Salon 6

The Art and Craft of the Short Story. What makes a short story great? What is the goal of a short story? What makes a short story a short story at all? Lydia Davis has short stories where the title is longer than the story, what’s up with that? Isn’t that more of a joke than a story? Who decides? Doesn’t everyone want to read novels and celebrity memoirs anyway? In this discussion we will ask a lot of questions, consider a variety of short stories with an eye to what each author is doing from a craft standpoint, we will talk about the what, how and maybe even the why so that we might apply these lessons to our own work, and what the heck, we will write a short short story, and we will revise it. Maybe we’ll even revise it again.

3:30pm-4:00pm

Graduate Lecture: Rebecca Marsh (Screenwriting)

Room: Salon 4

Visual Poetry. Just as poets speak great truths through the small details, so Screenwriters can expand theme and deepen character through carefully-chosen imagery. In this lecture, we will explore how (and why) to add poetry to a film through the use of visual motifs.

4:15pm-4:45pm

Graduate Lecture: Roy Finch (Screenwriting)

Room: Salon 4

Technophobia in Modern Cinema or Robot Did A Bad, Bad, Thing. The roots of Hollywood’s technophobia run deep. It started with fears stemming from the rise of the industrial revolution, later incorporating fear of robots, nuclear doomsday machines and computers. This talk will discuss modern technophobic themes including Artificial Intelligence and next-gen robotics and look at ways in which films like Ex Machina and Her use technology to explore more humanistic themes.”

4:45pm

Coachella Review Meeting

Room: Salon 6

Interested in working on The Coachella Review? Attend this meeting with the editors of the magazine.

Dinner

8:00pm

Evening Program: The Best Thing You’ve Never Heard Of (All) 

Mary Otis, Deanne Stillman, Anthony McCann, John Schimmel talk about the one super-obscure thing you absolutely must read or watch.

Room: Salon 6