Monday, June 4

Home/Monday, June 4

Books will be sold today.

8:00am: Breakfast

9:00am – 10:30am

Faculty Lecture: Mary Yukari Waters (F)

CREATING POWERFUL EMOTION THAT ISN’T CHEESY AND CRINGE-WORTHY. In every book, whatever the genre, there should be a few places where the character feels strong, genuine emotion. Writers are understandably scared to go there.  Navigating great emotion straddles that risky line between greatness and cheesiness.  It’s easy to come off sounding clumsy and stupid, or else over-flowery and hysterical. But if you avoid this area altogether, your writing has no heart and is eminently forgettable. In this lecture, we’ll learn some practical tips and see excellent examples of how it’s done.

Room: Salon 6

9:00am – 10:30am

Faculty Lecture: John Schimmel & Joshua Malkin (S)

Killer Openings. Knowing that distribution models are changing faster than anyone can keep up with, knowing that filmmakers have less and less control of the platforms on which their work is shown, the question of how we get people to exit their A.D.D. lives and pay attention to our work is increasingly compelling. The opening of a film can serve many masters. It can show off a role as actor candy. It can hook an audience on the journey of the protagonist. It can establish tone and rhythm and genre. It can cue an audience as to whether it will be okay to laugh and it can set us up to weep. And it can be the deciding factor as to whether those who can get your film made will continue reading. Come join Professors Schimmel and Malkin  as they analyze some openings that really worked.

Room: Salon 5

 10:30am – 12:00pm

Guest Faculty Lecture: Matt Salazar-Thompson (PL)

Strengthening Your Character Development – Objectives and Subtext

All stage characters need a clear objective, but how do you layer your characters with precision style subtext without giving away too much? How do symbols, poetic expression, and technical elements in your dialogue and stage directions propel the audience’s emotional and ideological participation in your play? How much subtext should you give to your character and when do they need to be direct and straightforward within the confines of their objectives and the super objective of the play? We’ll take a look at several examples from such veritable playwrights as Sarah Ruhl, Tennessee Williams, Sam Shepard, Shakespeare and Paula Vogel. Whether your piece is a laugh down drag out farce or a poignant drama, we’ll find the root of your characters’ subtexts. Writing exercises are included in this workshop, so bring your laptop or pad and pencil!

Room: Salon 5

 10:30am – 12:00pm

Faculty Lecture: Jill Alexander Essbaum (P)

Yo, Pep. I don’t think they’re gonna play this on the radio. Why? Because writing about sex is hard AF (heh).  Like sex itself, when done very well, erotically charged poetry or prose can coax a reader into ecstasy.  But when done badly (and it is so often done so very badly) it’s worse than actually having the bad sex that’s been written because you’ve left a record of it and signed your name. This lecture will cover a dos and don’ts of doing it… on paper.

Room: Salon 6

10:30am – 12:00pm

Guest Presentation: Maggie Gover Director, Graduate Professional Development at UCR will tell you all about Grad Slam…which is a fun (and profitable!) competition where grad students from throughout the UC system talk about their graduate theses in a competition-event (which you should win).  Maggie will also talk about public speaking.

Room: Salon 3

12:00pm – 1:00pm: Lunch

1:15pm – 4:15pm: Main Genre Workshops

Classes will be held in the Las Flores Conference Center
Map: http://www.rancholaspalmas.com/resort-map

Salons 1, 2 and 8 are located in the main conference and meeting area
Map: http://www.rancholaspalmas.com/resort-map

4:30pm

Graduate Lecture: Annie Connole (NF)

Mythic Landscapes : Creating Authentic Narratives for the American Woman

In an America known for eschewing historical memory, prizing the individual over the collective, and at a time when women are just beginning to emerge out of centuries of muted expression, many American women find themselves bereft of a common, guiding myth.  However, within the last half century, women writers have been creating mythic landscapes large and magical enough to hold the complexity of their lived experience.  In this lecture, we will look at how these mythic texts of nonfiction allow women writers to create a framework for examining meaning, morality, the sacred, and inheritance in a manner that authentically reflects the truth and transformation of the authors’ lives.

Room: Salon 5

5:15pm

Graduate Lecture: Sarah Sheppeck (F)

Am I Racist? Addressing Racial Diversity in American Literature.

The United States is one of the most diverse countries in the world, yet contemporary literature rarely reflects that level of diversity. When it does, characters are frequently separated into two categories: white people and “others.” In this lecture, we will break down terms such as “default whiteness,” discuss the way race is addressed by authors ranging from J.K. Rowling to N.K. Jemisin, and brainstorm ways that you – yes, you! – can diversify your fictional worlds without “making everything about race.” If this sounds like an SJW thing, that’s because it is.

Room: Salon 5

8:00pm

Evening Program: Student Readings in R Bar (coordinated by TAs)

Room: R Bar (main lobby)